addendum to week 4 – Loop input lesson idea

Posting this quickly, because I just realized how late it must be in Europe.  

I’ve had an idea for a tutor training lesson plan that would incorporate Loop Input. I’ve been sussing it all out, and querying doubts about it as I go along, as well. 

Basically: 

I would introduce the concepts of scaffolding (I’m thinking of having a “Jargon alert” sign) and engaging their students through visuals, hypothesis forming, eliciting experiences, pair work, etc.  I would also introduce them to the ECRIF/Bloom’s taxonomy as a framework.

I’m thinking about this because, though I’m behind the concept of scaffolding all the way, I find that I make a lot of mistakes in implementing it.  I’ve seen it with other tutors as well. It would be good to have a discussion of that issue.  It would also be a good time to talk about signs that show a student is overwhelmed.  I can see a lot of related issues coming up. 

 I also wanted to give them a framework to work from, but a fairly flexible one.  I do have doubts that even this framework would be too rigid/top down for 1 to 1 work, but I’d like to explore it.  

It would have to be a multi-part lesson, though.  I would like them to experience each stage of the framework, plus have time to decompress and be aware of what they’re doing perhaps at each stage.  That would take time.  

If they were constructing their own grids with the framework, they would have to have ideas of activities available and content/forms where it might be useful.  So, I’m not sure of the overall way in which to order the introduction of those things….

Thanks, 

Nell

 

 

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Author:

I've been tutoring ESOL and Basic Literacy since 2011, working out of our local small town libraries. Somewhere in there I decided to learn to be a better teacher only to find out that a Masters degree is only the beginning of learning. For 10 years I was a bike commuter and still love my bike and being outside, as long as someone yanks me off my current distraction (often computer related).

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